Late March/April Wrap-Up #Books #BookReviews #Music #ReadingChallenge

It’s hard to believe we’re coming into May! This month flew for me. Now that the weather is warming up and all the snow is gone, it’s been a pleasure to spend more time outside in nature. I’m feeling very positive about the upcoming growing season too.

I returned to blogging the second half of March. Because I missed that wrap-up, I’m going to combine everything I’ve posted since coming back. I’ve had a few good months and feel really good about being back here in the blogging community again, especially now that I’ve figured out the block editor. 🙂

Regular Book Reviews from March-April:

Continue reading “Late March/April Wrap-Up #Books #BookReviews #Music #ReadingChallenge”

Emblems on Book Covers: Good or Bad? #BookCovers #Opinions

I’m a person who feels that book covers are important. It’s the first thing you see, and more often than not, it pulls me in to check out the book. Many people say that covers don’t matter, but book covers make a big impression on me and engage me. Not only that, covers are art, and artists put time into creating aesthetics that have the power to bring a book to life. They fuss over title placement, graphics, and colors—everything that will make their cover a perfect fit and unique to their book.

This brings to mind something that’s been bugging me lately, and that’s the addition of an emblem on certain YA books: Reese’s YA Book Club. What is it that irritates me so much about these emblems?

  • They’re permanent: you can’t remove them because they’ve been printed on the cover.
  • They’re a huge eyesore and ruin the beautiful art of the cover.
  • Because these are getting printed on a large number of books, it takes away from the uniqueness of the book art.
Continue reading “Emblems on Book Covers: Good or Bad? #BookCovers #Opinions”

Book Review: Tigers, Not Daughters by Samantha Mabry #TigersNotDaughters #YoungAdult #BookReview

Tigers, Not Daughters by Samantha Mabry

Blurb:

The Torres sisters dream of escape. Escape from their needy and despotic widowed father, and from their San Antonio neighborhood, full of old San Antonio families and all the traditions and expectations that go along with them. In the summer after her senior year of high school, Ana, the oldest sister, falls to her death from her bedroom window. A year later, her three younger sisters, Jessica, Iridian, and Rosa, are still consumed by grief and haunted by their sister’s memory. Their dream of leaving Southtown now seems out of reach. But then strange things start happening around the house: mysterious laughter, mysterious shadows, mysterious writing on the walls. The sisters begin to wonder if Ana really is haunting them, trying to send them a message—and what exactly she’s trying to say.
 
In a stunning follow-up to her National Book Award–longlisted novel All the Wind in the World, Samantha Mabry weaves an aching, magical novel that is one part family drama, one part ghost story, and one part love story.

Continue reading “Book Review: Tigers, Not Daughters by Samantha Mabry #TigersNotDaughters #YoungAdult #BookReview”

Hatchet (Brian’s Saga #1) by Gary Paulsen #BookReview #MiddleGrade #Hatchet

Hatchet by Gary Paulsen

Blurb:

ALONE

Thirteen-year-old Brian Robeson is on his way to visit his father when the single-engine plane in which he is flying crashes. Suddenly, Brian finds himself alone in the Canadian wilderness with nothing but a tattered Windbreaker and the hatchet his mother gave him as a present—and the dreadful secret that has been tearing him apart since his parent’s divorce. But now Brian has no time for anger, self-pity, or despair—it will take all his know-how and determination, and more courage than he knew he possessed, to survive.

Continue reading “Hatchet (Brian’s Saga #1) by Gary Paulsen #BookReview #MiddleGrade #Hatchet”