Dr. Wangari Maathai Plants a Forest by Rebel Girls, Eugenia Mello #BookReview #ChildrensBooks

Dr. Wangari Maathai Plants a Forest

Blurb:

From the world of Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls comes the historical novel based on the life of Dr. Wangari Maathai, the Nobel Peace Prize-winning activist from Kenya.

Wangari lives in a magical place in rural Kenya where the soil is rich for planting, the trees abundant, and the nearby pond full of mysterious creatures. She drinks from cool, clean streams and plays beneath her favorite fig tree under her mother’s watchful gaze.

Then Wangari grows up and goes away to school, and things start changing at home. Farmers chop down the trees. Landslides bury the stream. The pond dries up. The soil becomes overworked, dry, and unusable for planting. And people go hungry. Dr. Wangari Maathai has a simple solution to all of these problems: plant trees.

Continue reading “Dr. Wangari Maathai Plants a Forest by Rebel Girls, Eugenia Mello #BookReview #ChildrensBooks”

Book Review: The Doubt Factor by Renée Paule #TheDoubtFactor #BookReview

The Doubt Factor

By Renée Paule

20191029_092622.jpg

My thoughts:

I’ve enjoyed all of Renée Paule’s books, but The Doubt Factor has become my favorite this far.

Having an analytical mind, I always tend to question and find myself in deep thought often. It’s probably true that anyone can benefit from deep thought in one way or another. I personally believe that it can better lives, but the challenge for me has always been acting on it. Perhaps this is what draws me back to Renee’s books: she always has a way of directing my mind toward profound thoughts because it’s easy to resonate with her, yet I still remain a seeker.

In The Doubt Factor, Renée Paule includes essays on habits, boredom, diet, escape, authority, and other subjects on human nature. It’s a fairly short book, but overflows with some thought-provoking ideas and, dare I say it, harsh realities that many of us probably won’t feel comfortable admitting to.

What are rights? If they belong to any one of us, then they belong to each and every one of us – no one human being has the right to cause the suffering of another. To cause the suffering of another human being is a terrible thing that reduces us to a state of barbarian, and we do cause the suffering of others – sometimes deliberately and sometimes inadvertently – to such a large extent that I often feel ashamed to be a member of the human race. To spend small fortunes on for example, going into outer space, when we haven’t ensured the right of every human being to have adequate food, water and shelter saddens me beyond the realms of grief. If we can’t live intelligently on our own planet, what atrocities are we destined to commit on others? We speak of ourselves as ‘advancing’ but when we look at this objectively, it couldn’t be further from the truth – technology is advancing, yes sure, but humanity is in rapid decline; what’s the good of the one without the other, and to whom?

Continue reading “Book Review: The Doubt Factor by Renée Paule #TheDoubtFactor #BookReview”

Review: Tom Hanks Biography: The Most Intriguing Movie Star Hollywood Has Ever Known: Biography Series by Chris Dicker

Tom Hanks Biography: The Most Intriguing Movie Star Hollywood Has Ever Known: Biography Series

33257972 Continue reading “Review: Tom Hanks Biography: The Most Intriguing Movie Star Hollywood Has Ever Known: Biography Series by Chris Dicker”