Shabby Sunday: Bittersweet – Stories and Poems from Scholastic Writing Awards 1926-1960 – Jerome Brondfield – 1962

Shabby Sunday

I have a lot of old vintage books and one of my plans when I first started blogging was to do a post every week or so that shared one of my cherished vintage books. Then I thought there might be other book bloggers out there that have some vintage books, heirlooms, or maybe some old books from childhood that they might want to share. I decided to start a weekly meme titled ‘Shabby Sunday’ for those who would like to participate and share some of their old vintage books. Do you have some shabby books you’d like to share? If so, please feel free to participate as anyone can join. Feel free to use the picture I’ve provided if you’d like to. If you decide to do this meme, please consider linking back to me so that I can see the book you’re sharing.


Today’s Shabby Share is:

Bittersweet: Stories and Poems from Scholastic Writing Awards, 1926-1960

by: Jerome Brondfield

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This is a book from my childhood that I know I’ve mentioned before on tags, but haven’t shared for Shabby Sunday. I’ve had this book since I was in 5th grade. Continue reading “Shabby Sunday: Bittersweet – Stories and Poems from Scholastic Writing Awards 1926-1960 – Jerome Brondfield – 1962”

Shabby Sunday: The Bremen-town Musicians – Ruth Belov Gross & Jack Kent 1974 (Including Audio)

Shabby Sunday

I have a lot of old vintage books and one of my plans when I first started blogging was to do a post every week or so that shared one of my cherished vintage books. Then I thought there might be other book bloggers out there that have some vintage books, heirlooms, or maybe some old books from childhood that they might want to share. I decided to start a weekly meme titled ‘Shabby Sunday’ for those who would like to participate and share some of their old vintage books. Do you have some shabby books you’d like to share? If so, please feel free to participate as anyone can join. Feel free to use the picture I’ve provided if you’d like to. If you decide to do this meme, please consider linking back to me so that I can see the book you’re sharing.


There’s a new participant this morning with a shabby share from her childhood! Please check out Jennifer @ jennifertarheelreader.com!


Today’s Shabby Share is:

The Bremen-Town Musicians

by

Jack Kent (Illustrator)
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Continue reading “Shabby Sunday: The Bremen-town Musicians – Ruth Belov Gross & Jack Kent 1974 (Including Audio)”

Shabby Sunday: Grizzwold by Syd Hoff – 1963

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Shabby Sunday

I have a lot of old vintage books and one of my plans when I first started blogging was to do a post every week or so that shared one of my cherished vintage books. Then I thought there might be other book bloggers out there that have some vintage books, heirlooms, or maybe some old books from childhood that they might want to share. I decided to start a weekly meme titled ‘Shabby Sunday’ for those who would like to participate and share some of their old vintage books. Do you have some shabby books you’d like to share? If so, please feel free to participate as anyone can join. Feel free to use the picture I’ve provided if you’d like to. If you decide to do this meme, please consider linking back to me so that I can see the book you’re sharing.


Today’s Shabby Share is:

Grizzwold (An I Can Read Book)

by

 

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Syd Hoff is one of my absolute favorite illustrators and this story goes way back to my own childhood. It’s an “I Can Read” book from 1963 that my children still enjoy reading today.  Continue reading “Shabby Sunday: Grizzwold by Syd Hoff – 1963”

Shabby Sunday: Nature’s Flying Janitor by Victoria Cox and Stan Applebaum – 1974

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Shabby Sunday

I have a lot of old vintage books and one of my plans when I first started blogging was to do a post every week or so that shared one of my cherished vintage books. Then I thought there might be other book bloggers out there that have some vintage books, heirlooms, or maybe some old books from childhood that they might want to share. I decided to start a weekly meme titled ‘Shabby Sunday’ for those who would like to participate and share some of their old vintage books. Do you have some shabby books you’d like to share? If so, please feel free to participate as anyone can join. Feel free to use the picture I’ve provided if you’d like to. If you decide to do this meme, please consider linking back to me so that I can see the book you’re sharing.


Today’s Shabby Share is:

Nature’s Flying Janitor

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This is my first Shabby Share that I actually had to add on Goodreads because it hadn’t been listed yet. I had no idea how easy it was to do that and it was a fun experience…

Continue reading “Shabby Sunday: Nature’s Flying Janitor by Victoria Cox and Stan Applebaum – 1974”

Shabby Sunday: Walt Disney Presents the Story of Hansel and Gretel with Songs by  Walt Disney Company – 1967

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Shabby Sunday

I have a lot of old vintage books and one of my plans when I first started blogging was to do a post every week or so that shared one of my cherished vintage books. Then I thought there might be other book bloggers out there that have some vintage books, heirlooms, or maybe some old books from childhood that they might want to share. I decided to start a weekly meme titled ‘Shabby Sunday’ for those who would like to participate and share some of their old vintage books. Do you have some shabby books you’d like to share? If so, please feel free to participate as anyone can join. Feel free to use the picture I’ve provided if you’d like to. If you decide to do this meme, please consider linking back to me so that I can see the book you’re sharing.


Today’s Shabby Share is:

Walt Disney presents the story of Hansel and Gretel with songs

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I know I’ve shared this book a few times before now on tags and also Claire’s Blogger’s Bookshelf post @Brizzlelassbooks, but I’d like to share it again today for Shabby Sunday.

Continue reading “Shabby Sunday: Walt Disney Presents the Story of Hansel and Gretel with Songs by  Walt Disney Company – 1967”

Shabby Sunday: The Red Pony by John Steinbeck – 1992

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Shabby Sunday

I have a lot of old vintage books and one of my plans when I first started blogging was to do a post every week or so that shared one of my cherished vintage books. Then I thought there might be other book bloggers out there that have some vintage books, heirlooms, or maybe some old books from childhood that they might want to share. I decided to start a weekly meme titled ‘Shabby Sunday’ for those who would like to participate and share some of their old vintage books. Do you have some shabby books you’d like to share? If so, please feel free to participate as anyone can join. Feel free to use the picture I’ve provided if you’d like to. If you decide to do this meme, please consider linking back to me so that I can see the book you’re sharing.


Today’s Shabby Share is:

The Red Pony

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Blurb from Goodreads:

Raised on a ranch in northern California, Jody is well-schooled in the hard work and demands of a rancher’s life. He is used to the way of horses, too; but nothing has prepared him for the special connection he will forge with Gabilan, the hot-tempered pony his father gives him. With Billy Buck, the hired hand, Jody tends and trains his horse, restlessly anticipating the moment he will sit high upon Gabilan’s saddle. But when Gabilan falls ill, Jody discovers there are still lessons he must learn about the ways of nature and, particularly, the ways of man.

My thoughts on this book:

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I can still remember reading this book for the first time when I was in junior high school and I didn’t like it. From the look of the cover and title, you’d think you’d be reading a happy little novella about a boy and his horse, but it’s so much more than that.

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The Red Pony is a collection of four short stories about a 10-year-old boy named Jody and his life on a ranch with his family. As time moves forward and he matures, Jody is exposed to multiple events and learns many lessons on what it means to be a man. Much of what he learns comes from his father and the farm hand named Billy. He looks up to them both.

“Jody did not ask where his father and Billy Buck were riding that day, but he wished he might go along. His father was a disciplinarian. Jody obeyed him in everything without questions of any kind.”

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I don’t want to summarize the four stories and spoil them for those that haven’t read this, but I will say I had a good mix of emotions when reading it for the second time. I was sad and angry multiple times and didn’t care for a few of the characters, but there was happiness here too, especially when Jody gains some responsibility and gets excited about upcoming future events like visiting with his grandfather, or caring for his pony by himself for the first time.

“Jody was glad when they had gone. He took brush and currycomb from the wall, took down the barrier of the box stall and stepped cautiously in.”

One thing I didn’t like, was how I didn’t really see Jody’s character change over time. With the death he’s experienced, he certainly doesn’t seem to be effected by it much and maybe that’s because as a boy, he wasn’t allowed to share his feelings vocally. His actions portray anger, but not a whole lot of sympathy for the animals themselves as he still continues to irritate them by throwing rocks, etc. He seems to forget about how sad he was to lose a friend to death and doesn’t make the connection.

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There are many themes in this book including coming of age, tragedy, death and disappointment to mention a few, but also one I didn’t truly pick up on the first time I read it. It appears that the modern men in the story don’t feel that they measure up to older men from the past. This is something I experienced myself–even as a female–when I moved out to the country. Being raised in the city meant that I didn’t have the experience the country folk had as far as raising your own food, and in turn, putting the animals to death. A lady I met within the first year of living in the country told me that my generation weren’t survivors and I had to stand corrected as I realized there was no way I was going to cut a chicken’s head off with my hand like she did so effortlessly, in fact, I wasn’t ever going to do it. There were multiple times in the book that I cringed because of the details that were given and it reminded me of this very moment in my life, but this is farm life, whether you’re exposed or not and that’s just part of it.

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Overall, this is a powerful little novel and worth a try. You might end up hating it, or you might be sucked into the writing like I was because it’s so descriptive and realistic.  I wound up devouring this in one sitting when reading it for the second time.

My copy is from 1992, not very old, but still vintage. It’s in good condition for the most part with mainly cover wear.

My rating is 4****


Find this book on Goodreads and Amazon:

  • Paperback, 100 pages
  • Published January 1st 1992 by Penguin (Non-Classics) (first published 1933)
  • Original Title: The Red Pony
  • ISBN: 0140177361 (ISBN13: 9780140177367)

Other blogs who have participated in Shabby Sunday:

Nicky@ An Introverted Bookworm

TheOrangutanLibrarian

Claire@ Brizzle Lass Books

Author Didi Oviatt

Sassy Brit@ Alternative-Read

Brittany @ PerfectlyTolerable

Shari @ Sharisakurai.com


Thanks for checking out Shabby Sunday! Have you read this book or others by John Steinbeck? Feel free to share your thoughts below. ❤

Shabby Sunday: The Mystery of Chimney Rock (Choose Your Own Adventure #5) by Edward Packard – 1981

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Shabby Sunday

I have a lot of old vintage books and one of my plans when I first started blogging was to do a post every week or so that shared one of my cherished vintage books. Then I thought there might be other book bloggers out there that have some vintage books, heirlooms, or maybe some old books from childhood that they might want to share. I decided to start a weekly meme titled ‘Shabby Sunday’ for those who would like to participate and share some of their old vintage books. Do you have some shabby books you’d like to share? If so, please feel free to participate as anyone can join. Feel free to use the picture I’ve provided if you’d like to. If you decide to do this meme, please consider linking back to me so that I can see the book you’re sharing.


Today’s Shabby Share is:

The Mystery Of Chimney Rock (Choose Your Own Adventure #5)

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Continue reading “Shabby Sunday: The Mystery of Chimney Rock (Choose Your Own Adventure #5) by Edward Packard – 1981”

Shabby Sunday: Best Loved Songs of the American People by Denes Agay – 1975

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Shabby Sunday

I have a lot of old vintage books and one of my plans when I first started blogging was to do a post every week or so that shared one of my cherished vintage books. Then I thought that maybe there might be other book bloggers out there that have some vintage books, heirlooms, or maybe some old books from childhood that they might want to share. I decided to start a weekly meme titled ‘Shabby Sunday’ for those who would like to participate and share some of their old vintage books. Do you have some shabby books you’d like to share? If so, please feel free to participate as anyone can join. Feel free to use the picture I’ve provided if you’d like to. If you decide to do this meme, please consider linking back to me so that I can see the book you’re sharing.

Today’s Shabby Share is:

Best Loved Songs of the American People

 

20180325_111142.jpg Continue reading “Shabby Sunday: Best Loved Songs of the American People by Denes Agay – 1975”

Shabby Sunday: Demelza (Poldark #2) by Winston Graham – 1977

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Shabby Sunday

I have a lot of old vintage books and one of my plans when I first started blogging was to do a post every week or so that shared one of my cherished vintage books. Then I thought that maybe there might be other book bloggers out there that have some vintage books, heirlooms, or maybe some old books from childhood that they might want to share. I decided to start a weekly meme titled ‘Shabby Sunday’ for those who would like to participate and share some of their old vintage books. Do you have some shabby books you’d like to share? Please feel free to participate. Feel free to use the picture I’ve provided if you’d like to. If you decide to do this meme, please consider linking back to me so that I can see the book you’re sharing.

Today’s Shabby Share is:

Demelza (The Poldark Saga #2)

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Summary: Ross Poldark had returned from the war in the American colonies filled with a bold vision which made him a stranger to the elegant and delicately-bred society which had nurtured him. His marriage to Demelza, the fiery young vixen from the basest ranks of the poor, had inflamed the antagonism of those who had once been his friends.

But for Demelza it meant a crueler and more bitter struggle than any she had ever known. Side by side with the man she loved, she fought for the passion that united them and for the future of the child she was to bear…-Goodreads

My Thoughts:

This is one of my favorites out of all the Poldark books. In this installment, Ross Poldark and Demelza are now happily married and giving birth to their first child, Julia. She struggles with the marriage because there are great challenges including Elizabeth’s shadow over Ross. Even though Elizabeth is married to Francis, she will never forget that Ross once loved her and she’s determined to create the best marriage and life possible with him, to win his true love. Demelza’s character matures and grows as she becomes more confident in society and she proves herself to Ross and everyone else equally.

Much happens in this installment with the birth of Julia and also Demelza’s persistence with getting Verity coupled with Captain Blamey. She knows that Verity deserves to have a life of love–like everyone else–even if it’s against the family’s wishes. Ross spends much time away from home and deals with his business ventures. The drama between the Warleggans’ and the Poldarks’ ensues…

“George stared across the street. ‘There is only one trouble with the Poldarks,’ he said after a moment. ‘They cannot take a beating.’
‘And only one trouble with the Warleggans,’ said Ross. ‘They never know when they are not wanted.’
George’s color deepened. ‘But they can appreciate and remember an insult.’
‘Well, I trust you will remember this one.’ Ross turned his back and went down the steps into the tavern.” 

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I love all the primary and secondary characters in this series! They’re well developed and all the books are full of scenes that keep you reading until the last page. I love the world Winston Graham created and all the drama to go with it including the love, jealously, murder, crime, death, grief, and hate. There’s so much going on here and in just one novel.

I admire my edition of Demelza because it was published during my year of birth and I think the cover is very interesting. Even though I don’t like small paperbacks that much, I made an exception with this one because it matches my set. The pages are faded a bit, but it’s in fairly decent shape for its age at forty years.

 

5*****
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Continue reading “Shabby Sunday: Demelza (Poldark #2) by Winston Graham – 1977”

Shabby Sunday: Cinderella (Matthew Hope #6) by Ed McBain – 1986

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Shabby Sunday

I have a lot of old vintage books and one of my plans when I first started blogging was to do a post every week or so that shared one of my cherished vintage books. Then I thought that maybe there might be other book bloggers out there that have some vintage books, heirlooms, or maybe some old books from childhood that they might want to share. I decided to start a weekly meme titled ‘Shabby Sunday’ for those who would like to participate and share some of their old vintage books. Do you have some shabby books you’d like to share? Please feel free to participate. Feel free to use the picture I’ve provided if you’d like to. If you decide to do this meme, please consider linking back to me so that I can see the book you’re sharing.


Today’s Shabby Share is:

Cinderella (Matthew Hope #6)

 

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Summary: 

Private detective Otto Samalson sees the tail—a black Toronado he can’t shake. One dark window rolls down, exposing the barrel of a gun, and the detective is dead.

Otto had already known his days were numbered and said as much to his friend, attorney Matthew Hope. Having hired Otto to watch a cheating husband for a client, Matthew is now left with only Otto’s tape recorder, filled with proof of an affair. But could the evidence lead to something larger, something that would drive a man to kill?

Meanwhile, a mysterious woman is on the run, her face and name unknown to all except two stepsisters who couldn’t care less if a violent pair of Cubans got their hands on her. If Matthew can decipher the clues in Otto’s evidence, there’s a chance he could reach the girl first and save her life.

A chilling addition to the Matthew Hope series from Ed McBain, Cinderella is the tale of a woman known by many names and the men who will do anything to find her. – Goodreads

My Thoughts:

I went to this amazing book sale last year and picked up a beautiful large stack of vintage hardcover books for right around .50 cents a piece–all of them mysteries that I’d never read. This one is the 6th novel in the Matthew Hope series.

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I went on Goodreads to add them all to my reading list and a few of my friends left some positive comments on the series. I haven’t read any of them yet, and the list is long, but I’m hoping to get into some of these this year. I’m not sure if these need to be read in order or not, but I don’t have all of them anyway. I’m missing three in the series. I figure I can find them at my library if I need to fit a few in.

Continue reading “Shabby Sunday: Cinderella (Matthew Hope #6) by Ed McBain – 1986”

Shabby Sunday: The Call of the Wild Illustrated Classics by Jack London (Mitsu Yamamoto) 1989

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Shabby Sunday

I have a lot of old vintage books and one of my plans when I first started blogging was to do a post every week or so that shared one of my cherished vintage books. Then I thought that maybe there might be other book bloggers out there that have some vintage books, heirlooms, or maybe some old books from childhood that they might want to share. I decided to start a weekly meme titled ‘Shabby Sunday’ for those who would like to participate and share some of their old vintage books. Do you have some shabby books you’d like to share? Please feel free to participate. Feel free to use the picture I’ve provided if you’d like to. If you decide to do this meme, please consider linking back to me so that I can see the book you’re sharing.


Today’s shabby share is:

The Call of the Wild (Great Illustrated Classics)

by Mitsu Yamamoto (Adapter)Jack LondonPablo Marcos Studio(Illustrator)
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Continue reading “Shabby Sunday: The Call of the Wild Illustrated Classics by Jack London (Mitsu Yamamoto) 1989”

Shabby Sunday: Owl Moon by Jane Yolen and John Schoenherr – 1987

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Shabby Sunday

I have a lot of old vintage books and one of my plans when I first started blogging was to do a post every week or so that shared one of my cherished vintage books. Then I thought that maybe there might be other book bloggers out there that have some vintage books, heirlooms, or maybe some old books from childhood that they might want to share. I decided to start a weekly meme titled ‘Shabby Sunday’ for those who would like to participate and share some of their old vintage books. Do you have some shabby books you’d like to share? Please feel free to participate. Feel free to use the picture I’ve provided if you’d like to. If you decide to do this meme, please consider linking back to me so that I can see the book you’re sharing.


Today’s shabby share is:

Owl Moon 

by Jane YolenJohn Schoenherr (Illustrator) 

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Blurb: Late one winter night a little girl and her father go owling. The trees stand still as statues and the world is silent as a dream. Whoo-whoo-whoo, the father calls to the mysterious nighttime bird.

But there is no answer.

Wordlessly the two companions walk along, for when you go owling you don’t need words. You don’t need anything but hope. Sometimes there isn’t an owl, but sometimes there is.

Distinguished author Jane Yolen has created a gentle, poetic story that lovingly depicts the special companionship of a young child and her father as well as humankind’s close relationship to the natural world. Wonderfully complemented by award-winning John Schoenherr’s soft, exquisite watercolor illustrations, this is a verbal and visual treasure, perfect for reading aloud and sharing at bedtime.

My Thoughts:

I chose this book because it’s one of my personal favorites from when I was a child and now its cherished by my children as well.

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Owl Moon is a striking story that takes you on a journey through the winter woods in search of owls. The little child has been waiting to go owling with Pa for a very long time. The story rather reads like poetry.

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Our feet crunched over the crisp snow and little gray footprints followed us. Pa made a long shadow, but mine was short and round. I had to run after him every now and then to keep up, and my short, round, shadow bumped after me.”

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John Schoenherr’s illustrated imagery paints the perfect winter impression and this is a ideal book for bedtime that highlights the companionship between parent and child.

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Our copy is an old Scholastic paperback edition from 1988. It’s in fairly good shape with clean pages.

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This is surely one we’ll keep…

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Continue reading “Shabby Sunday: Owl Moon by Jane Yolen and John Schoenherr – 1987”

Shabby Sunday: Favorite Stories Old and New by Sidonie Matsner Gruenberg – 1955

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Shabby Sunday Meme

I have a lot of old vintage books and one of my plans when I first started blogging was to do a post every week or so that shared one of my cherished vintage books. Then I thought that maybe there might be other book bloggers out there that have some vintage books, heirlooms, or maybe some old books from childhood that they might want to share. I decided to start a weekly meme titled ‘Shabby Sunday’ for those who would like to participate and share some of their old vintage books. Do you have some shabby books you’d like to share? Please feel free to participate. Feel free to use the picture I’ve provided if you’d like to. If you decide to do this meme, please consider linking back to me so that I can see the book you’re sharing.


Today’s shabby share is:

Favorite Stories Old and New

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Blurb: This revised edition is enlarged by twenty-six stories. The divisions are as follows: Real children and real things, Stories about animals, Stories of make-believe, Fairy tales, Folk tales, Myths and fables, Bible stories and Tales of laughter.
*I apologize for the cramming of content. WordPress is not cooperating today.*

My Thoughts:

This book is a really special one! It belonged to my grandfather and is one of the only books I have left from him. This one sat on the shelf in our living room the whole time I was growing up and now it sits on mine.
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It’s a book of short stories that were compiled for children to read. Some are about real people and events, animals, make-believe, folk tales, and even some Bible stories. There are also a few fables included. Many are stories that are well known, like Cinderella, The Three Bears, David and Goliath, Davy Crockett, and Pandora’s Box. They’re short enough that young readers won’t lose interest.
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Some of my favorites include: The Middle Bear, Indians in the House, The Coyote and the Fox, Black Face, The Lion-Hearted Kitten, Snow White, Cinderella, The Snow Maiden, and The Wind and the Sun. This isn’t just a book for children and can be enjoyed by all ages.
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My version is a hardcover Doubleday edition from 1955. It lacks the dust jacket and has very bad wear to the fabric cover. The pages are still fairly clean and crisp to read with only minor smudging.
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There really aren’t a lot of illustrations in the book, but the sketches that are included are whimsical and interesting.
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Without the dust jacket, the cover is very plain with only a few black illustrations on the front cover and binding.
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I’m very happy to have this book and won’t ever part with it. It’s not just limited to children! Even with it’s age, my children and I are still interested in these classic stories that boost their imagination. It’s a real gem of a book to have.

Continue reading “Shabby Sunday: Favorite Stories Old and New by Sidonie Matsner Gruenberg – 1955”

Shabby Sunday: Animal Farm by George Orwell – 1946

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Shabby Sunday Meme

I have a lot of old vintage books and one of my plans when I first started blogging was to do a post every week or so that shared one of my cherished vintage books. Then I thought that maybe there might be other book bloggers out there that have some vintage books, heirlooms, or maybe some old books from childhood that they might want to share. I decided to start a weekly meme titled ‘Shabby Sunday’ for those who would like to participate and share some of their old vintage books. Do you have some shabby books you’d like to share? Please feel free to participate. Feel free to use the picture I’ve provided if you’d like to. If you decide to do this meme, please consider linking back to me so that I can see the book you’re sharing.


Today’s shabby share is:

Animal Farm (A Signet Classic)

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Blurb: George Orwell’s timeless fable—a parable for would-be liberators everywhere, glimpsed through the lens of our own history.

As ferociously fresh as it was more than a half century ago, this remarkable allegory of a downtrodden society of overworked, mistreated animals, and their quest to create a paradise of progress, justice, and equality is one of the most scathing satires ever published. As we witness the rise and bloody fall of the revolutionary animals, we begin to recognize the seeds of totalitarianism in the most idealistic organization; and in our most charismatic leaders, the souls of our cruelest oppressors. – Amazon

My Thoughts:

I read Animal Farm when I was in college and it was one of those reads where you think it’s going to be boring, but it turns out to be a favorite. It’s an allegorical tale representing the Russian Revolution where the characters in the book represent people during this time.

I won’t go into the plot too much, but in a nutshell, this story is about a group of farm animals who rise up against the evil farmer who cares for them. They basically take over the farm by cause of Old Major (Marx/Lenen), the pig all about change. He get’s all the animals together into an uprising against Mr. Jones, the farmer (Tsar Nicholas II). The animal characters then run the farm themselves and develop their own hierarchy being lead by Snowball (Trotsky) and Napoleon (Stalin). In a way, the story reminds me of an Aesop’s Fable because the animal characters in the book have human characteristics and there are morals and messages that are quite obvious. Young readers can read it and they won’t pick up on the meaning–they’ll just think it’s a story about a group of  rebellious farm animals against humans, but I believe the message that Orwell wanted to express is that power corrupts. Also that people need to think for themselves, educate yourself and make your own decisions. Don’t let others think for you.

Someone recently asked me who my favorite character was in the book which is a really difficult question to ask, in my opinion. I liked a handful of the characters including Boxer, Snowball, Benjamin, and Clover, but if I had to choose a favorite, it would have to be Snowball. Snowball’s ideas were in the best interests of the animals and he was always fair. He wanted to educate the other animals and make life easier for them. He was intelligent, brave, and stood up for his beliefs which is why he’s my favorite character in the book.

I’m not sure exactly how old my edition is of Animal Farm because no publication date is given, however, Goodreads seems to have this Signet Classic published in 1956. This thin paperback is in great shape for it’s age with clean, crisp pages.

My rating on this one is 5*****

Here’s the song “Beasts of England” passed on to the animals by Old Major: 


Beasts of England

Beasts of England, Beasts of Ireland,
Beasts of every land and clime,
Hearken to my joyful tidings
Of the Golden future time.
 
Soon or late the day is coming,
Tyrant Man shall be o’erthrown,
And the fruitful fields of England
Shall be trod by beasts alone.
 
Rings shall vanish from our noses,
And the harness from our back,
Bit and spur shall rust forever,
Cruel whips no more shall crack.
 
Riches more than mind can picture,
Wheat and barley, oats and hay,
Clover, beans, and mangel-wurzels
Shall be ours upon that day.
 
Bright will shine the fields of England,
Purer shall its waters be,
Sweeter yet shall blow its breezes
On the day that sets us free.
 
For that day we all must labour,
Though we die before it break;
Cows and horses, geese and turkeys,
All must toil for freedom’s sake.
 
Beasts of England, Beasts of Ireland,
Beasts of every land and clime,
Hearken well, and spread my tidings
Of the Golden future time.
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Continue reading “Shabby Sunday: Animal Farm by George Orwell – 1946”

Shabby Sunday: Death Not Be Proud by John Gunther – 1965

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Shabby Sunday Meme

I have a lot of old vintage books and one of my plans when I first started blogging was to do a post every week or so that shared one of my cherished vintage books. Then I thought that maybe there might be other book bloggers out there that have some vintage books, heirlooms, or maybe some old books from childhood that they might want to share. I decided to start a weekly meme titled ‘Shabby Sunday’ for those who would like to participate and share some of their old vintage books. Do you have some shabby books you’d like to share? Please feel free to participate. Feel free to use the picture I’ve provided if you’d like to. If you decide to do this meme, please consider linking back to me so that I can see the book you’re sharing.


Today’s shabby share is:

Death Be Not Proud

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 Blurb: Death Be Not Proud chronicles Johnny Gunther’s gallant struggle against the malignant brain tumor that killed him at the age of seventeen. The book opens with his father’s fond, vivid portrait of his son – a young man of extraordinary intellectual promise, who excelled at physics, math, and chess, but was also an active, good-hearted, and fun-loving kid. But the heart of the book is a description of the agonized months during which Gunther and his former wife Frances try everything in their power to halt the spread of Johnny’s cancer and to make him as happy and comfortable as possible. In the last months of his life, Johnny strove hard to complete his high school studies. The scene of his graduation ceremony from Deerfield Academy is one of the most powerful – and heartbreaking – in the entire book. Johnny maintained his courage, wit and quiet friendliness up to the end of his life. He died on June 30, 1947, less than a month after graduating from Deerfield.

My Thoughts:

This isn’t a book I normally pick up, but I purchased it in a box of books from a church sale years ago, and after going through some of these books recently, it caught my attention. I love reading memoirs, but not so much when it’s a story about a child with cancer. I took a chance and continued reading because I’d already read the blurb and knew what to expect. If you plan to read this book, you may want to skip my review altogether. The edition I’m reviewing is from 1965.

In the beginning of the book, John Gunther writes about his son Johnny and describes him as a happy child who loves to spend time with his parents when he’s not in school. Not only is he a happy and active child, but he’s extremely intelligent and loves school. When he returns home in 1946 for a break, he begins to have some strange symptoms and eventually is diagnosed with a brain tumor. Of course, this was back in a day before there were better treatments for cancer like there are now, and some of the treatments that Johnny undertakes are unorthodox. In fact, this is the first book I’ve read that documents a patient’s story after attempting Dr. Gerson’s methods for battling cancer.

The book is written in two parts. In the first part, the reader learns about Johnny, his diagnosis and some of his treatments. This was definitely a difficult part for me to finish. It’s heart-wrenching, but Johnny was so strong. His parents are with him constantly and move mountains to find him the best treatments possible. They continually search for a cure.

The second part contains a short diary that Johnny wrote and also letters, many from before his diagnosis. I would’ve liked to read the letters from before his diagnosis first, before reading Part 1, but this isn’t the way the book is organized. The final pages in the book contain a note from Johnny’s mother, Frances. In the note, she discusses the many questions you ask with the impending death of a child and there’s a statement that we all hear too often. A statement that reminds us we are never guaranteed any exact measure of time.

“Yet at the end of them all, when one has put away all the books, and all the words, when one is alone with oneself, when one is alone with God, what is left in one’s heart? Just this: I wish we had loved Johnny more.”  

Overall, even with all the agonizing parts of the story, I’m glad I finished the book. In my opinion, it’s written very well. I’d recommend it to anyone who likes to read memoirs.

4****

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Continue reading “Shabby Sunday: Death Not Be Proud by John Gunther – 1965”

Shabby Sunday: Christmas Trees and How They Grow by Glenn O. Blough – 1961

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Shabby Sunday Meme

I have a lot of old vintage books and one of my plans when I first started blogging was to do a post every week or so that shared one of my cherished vintage books. Then I thought that maybe there might be other book bloggers out there that have some vintage books, heirlooms, or maybe some old books from childhood that they might want to share. I decided to start a weekly meme titled ‘Shabby Sunday’ for those who would like to participate and share some of their old vintage books. Do you have some shabby books you’d like to share? Please feel free to participate. Feel free to use the picture I’ve provided if you’d like to. If you decide to do this meme, please consider linking back to me so that I can see the book you’re sharing.


 

Today’s shabby share is:

Christmas Trees and How They Grow

by Glenn O. BloughJeanne Bendick (Illustrator)
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Blurb: The characteristics of the various kinds of trees used as Christmas trees with information on where they grow and how to make a Christmas tree for the birds.

My Thoughts:

This is such an interesting book for kids to read about Christmas trees. The beginning narrative tells about a family who are out looking for the perfect Christmas tree and along the way the children learn facts about which trees are best, how they grow, the different types of Christmas trees and how to sprout pine tree seeds. The book contains interesting illustrations throughout to help kids identify the different types of trees.

Christmas Trees and How They Grow is very educational and might even teach adults a thing or two. Do you know how to find a pine tree’s seeds? How can you grow your own Christmas tree and how long will it take? How to people around the United States celebrate their Christmas trees? How can you set up a Christmas tree outside for the birds in the winter for feeding? Pick up this book to find out and settle in for a journey to learn about our truly amazing Mother Nature. Children will appreciate trees and forests  and understand how important they are after reading this book.

My edition is from 1961 and apparantly the only edition that’s available. It’s a previous library book, but it’s in fairly good shape for it’s age. It has a hard fabric cover. I ended up picking this up from a library book sale and what a find it is! You can find some real gems at sales which is why I love going to these sales so much. You never know what you’ll find.

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Continue reading “Shabby Sunday: Christmas Trees and How They Grow by Glenn O. Blough – 1961”

Shabby Sunday: Return to Oz by Joan D. Vinge 1985

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Shabby Sunday Meme

I have a lot of old vintage books and one of my plans when I first started blogging was to do a post every week or so that shared one of my cherished vintage books. Then I thought that maybe there might be other book bloggers out there that have some vintage books, heirlooms, or maybe some old books from childhood that they might want to share. I decided to start a weekly meme titled ‘Shabby Sunday’ for those who would like to participate and share some of their old vintage books. Do you have some shabby books you’d like to share? Please feel free to participate. Feel free to use the picture I’ve provided if you’d like to. If you decide to do this meme, please consider linking back to me so that I can see the book you’re sharing.


Today’s shabby share is:

Return to Oz

by Joan D. Vinge

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Blurb: Dorothy returns to Oz during a storm only to find that the magical kingdom has been conquered by the evil Nome King and Mombi the Witch, and she sets out with the Scarecrow, Tin Man, Cowardly Lion, and other new friends to find the rightful ruler.

I chose this book for today’s Shabby Sunday because I enjoyed this movie as a child and I love the novelization. My copy is the original from 1985 and is in very rough shape with a worn cover and heavy wear to the pages. 

My Thoughts:

After Dorothy’s original return from Oz, Aunt Em and Uncle Henry tell her that Oz was never real, but Dorothy finds a key from Oz and realizes that it simply isn’t true. A wicked storm returns her to Oz, but she finds that it’s nothing like it was when she left.

I read this many years ago after watching the movie featuring Fairuza Balk. The book is way better than the movie, in my opinion, because it really gets into the characters and their feelings. It covers the entire story of the movie, but also has added extras from the original screenplay that weren’t in the movie.

The writing is simple and this is a quick, easy read that’s even suitable for upper elementary readers. Although I remember the movie being a little scary, the book isn’t as bad and I wouldn’t hesitate to read it out loud to my younger kids. There are also photographs from the movie which make it even more enjoyable. Even though I would prefer Baum’s original Oz books over this one, it’s still one that I’ll keep on my shelf for the nostalgia. This gets a 3.5-star rating from me.

 


 

Get this on Amazon or add it to Goodreads

  • Mass Market Paperback: 214 pages
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books; Media Tie-In edition (May 12, 1985)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 034532207X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345322074

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Continue reading “Shabby Sunday: Return to Oz by Joan D. Vinge 1985”

Shabby Sunday: Roald Dahl – Switch Bitch – 1974

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Shabby Sunday Meme

I have a lot of old vintage books and one of my plans when I first started blogging was to do a post every week or so that shared one of my cherished vintage books. Then I thought that maybe there might be other book bloggers out there that have some vintage books, heirlooms, or maybe some old books from childhood that they might want to share. I decided to start a weekly meme titled ‘Shabby Sunday’ for those who would like to participate and share some of their old vintage books. Do you have some shabby books you’d like to share? Please feel free to participate. Feel free to use the picture I’ve provided if you’d like to. If you decide to do this meme, please consider linking back to me so that I can see the book you’re sharing.


Today’s shabby share is:

Switch Bitch

by Roald Dahl

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Blurb: Switch Bitch is a 1974 short story collection for adults by Roald Dahl. The book is made up of four stories: “The Visitor,” “The Great Switcheroo,” “The Last Act,” and “Bitch”. The stories had been written by Dahl for Playboy magazine and published separately in 1965.

My Thoughts:

Roald Dahl wrote dirty stories for adults? Yes, he did! I ended up getting this in a lot of Roald Dahl books that I purchased online. I was intrigued because I always considered him solely a children’s book author, but it isn’t so.

This book contains four stories that were originally published in Playboy magazine. I won’t formally review this one quite yet because so far I’ve only read one, The Visitor, and it was pretty good but incredibly weird to me. This really isn’t my kind of reading, but I enjoy branching out and reading books like these sometimes. It’s all writing without any illustrations and all the stories do involve sex which makes it inappropriate for young readers.

If you like Roald Dahl and you’re looking for some adult reading, this one is worth taking a look. It’s definitely different!


 

You can find this book on Amazon and Goodreads

  • Hardcover: 210 pages
  • Publisher: Alfred a Knopf Inc; 1 edition (September 1, 1974)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0394494733
  • ISBN-13: 978-0394494739

 

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Continue reading “Shabby Sunday: Roald Dahl – Switch Bitch – 1974”

Shabby Sunday: The Nature Doctor by Dr. H.C.A. Vogel – 1991

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Shabby Sunday Meme

I have a lot of old vintage books and one of my plans when I first started blogging was to do a post every week or so that shared one of my cherished vintage books. Then I thought that maybe there might be other book bloggers out there that have some vintage books, heirlooms, or maybe some old books from childhood that they might want to share. I decided to start a weekly meme titled ‘Shabby Sunday’ for those who would like to participate and share some of their old vintage books. Do you have some shabby books you’d like to share? Please feel free to participate. Feel free to use the picture I’ve provided if you’d like to. If you decide to do this meme, please consider linking back to me so that I can see the book you’re sharing.


Today’s shabby share is:

The Nature Doctor

by Alfred Vogel (Dr. H.C.A. Vogel)

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Blurb: The first British edition of this worldwide bestseller, The Nature Doctor, fully revised and updated, comes complete with comprehensive appendices, offering the reader easy access to a wealth of information from the ‘father’ of natural healing.

Dr. H. C. A. Vogel comes from a Swiss family where the secrets of herbalism were known and practiced. From early childhood he was eager to learn about the healing powers of plants and bit by bit he collected and expanded the traditional and empirical knowledge of European folk-medicine. Since 1929 he has reported his experiences and observations as a nature practitioner, nutritionist, researcher of medicinal plants and discoverer of natural healing powers, in his monthly periodical Gesundheit-Nachrichten (A. Vogel’s Health News).

First published in 1952, The Nature Doctor has become a recognized standard publication even among medical doctors and scientists.

I chose this book because it’s one of my favorite health book finds of all time and from 1991. I found this book at a rummage sale years ago and I’ve used it so much and it’s fairly shabby. My copy has scratches, a bent cover and pages, and heavy wear to the binding.


My Thoughts:

Ever since I found this book, I’ve discovered so many natural cures and reliable remedies that have helped me in so many ways. I’m not always a fan of self-help/health books, but this one is a favorite.

There are treatments for multiple conditions including wounds, burns, colds, diseases, and many other ailments. There are diet recommendations for prevention which teaches us how we can keep ourselves clean and free from disease before it strikes. Prevention is better than cure! It contains multiple sections of information on how to care for our bodies from our hair to our feet and stay connected to the earth. One of my favorite paragraphs in the book discusses walking barefoot.

Walking barefoot is increasingly becoming a thing of the past. In fact, nowadays many people associate it with poverty or excentricity — they look down on it. Just try it and dare to go for a long walk without your shoes and watch how many glances of surprise, pity, and even contempt you will attract. What does this indicate? That the onlookers have all but forgotten or never learned the benefits of walking. They know nothing of the peculiar, mysterious power it can convey, or else they would not react the way they do. If you go for an early morning walk on dewy grass you will soon notice that going barefoot makes you feel really good, generating new strength when you have been feeling tired and worn out. It is like recharging one’s batteries, so to speak, recharging your run-down nerves with energy. It seems as if Mother Earth is giving off energy that improves glandular functions. This is why I consider it rather strange that, although overtired and worn-out, we do not take full advantage of this simple regenerative treatment, which is able to stimulate our endocrine glands to increase their activity. 

I noticed that only a few of the actual medicines may be out of date, but most of the book offers a plethora of natural medicine treatments from plants (herbs, fruits, and vegetables). It answers simple questions about calcium, what type of rice to eat, and even cancer causes and what to do about it. There’s so much we can control by just eating the right foods that are available to us and The Nature Doctor reminds us that everything we need to stay healthy is right here on Earth and within our grasp! Readers will also be inspired by simple measures such as taking a brisk walk outside and breathing in deeply.

I recommend this book for anyone who has an interest in natural medicine, wants to stay healthy, or those that suffer from sickness, common ailments, or disease.

5 Sterne

Find this book on Goodreads and Amazon

  • Paperback: 678 pages
  • Publisher: Keats Pub; Rev Sub edition (November 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0879835591
  • ISBN-13: 978-0879835590

 

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Continue reading “Shabby Sunday: The Nature Doctor by Dr. H.C.A. Vogel – 1991”

Shabby Sunday: Outlander by Diana Gabaldon – 1991

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Today is my 5th Shabby Sunday! To see all the Shabby Sunday books that I’ve chosen, please click on ‘Shabby Sunday’ under categories.


Shabby Sunday Meme

I have a lot of old vintage books and one of my plans when I first started blogging was to do a post every week or so that shared one of my cherished vintage books. Then, I thought that maybe there might be other book bloggers out there that have some vintage books, heirlooms, or maybe some old books from childhood that they might want to share. I decided to start a weekly meme titled ‘Shabby Sunday’ for those who would like to participate and share some of their old vintage books. Do you have some shabby books you’d like to share? Please feel free to participate. Feel free to use the picture I’ve provided if you’d like to. If you decide to do this meme, please consider linking back to me so that I can see the book you’re sharing.


 

Today’s shabby share is:

Outlander

by Diana Gabaldon

1991

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I chose this book because believe it or not, it was written in 1991 – 26 years ago! My copy is the first edition from 1991. I love the cover.

Blurb: Claire Randall is leading a double life. She has a husband in one century, and a lover in another…

In 1945, Claire Randall, a former combat nurse, is back from the war and reunited with her husband on a second honeymoon—when she innocently touches a boulder in one of the ancient stone circles that dot the British Isles. Suddenly she is a Sassenach—an “outlander”—in a Scotland torn by war and raiding border clans in the year of our Lord…1743.

Hurled back in time by forces she cannot understand, Claire’s destiny in soon inextricably intertwined with Clan MacKenzie and the forbidden Castle Leoch. She is catapulted without warning into the intrigues of lairds and spies that may threaten her life …and shatter her heart. For here, James Fraser, a gallant young Scots warrior, shows her a passion so fierce and a love so absolute that Claire becomes a woman torn between fidelity and desire…and between two vastly different men in two irreconcilable lives.

My Thoughts:

Claire Randall is a nurse living in Scotland with Frank, her husband, just after the end of World War II. Frank is absorbed in studying his family tree and tracking one of his ancestors named “Black Jack” Randall. Claire has an interest in Botany and studies plants along with their healing factors.

One day, Claire comes across a stone circle called Craigh na Dun.

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While there, she discovers a plant and can’t stop thinking about it. She comes back another day to collect the plant near the stones and hears one of the stones scream. One after another, they all scream. Something strange is happening and Claire wakes up in Scotland, but in 1743. She witnesses men in kilts and a man that looks like Frank but isn’t. Quickly, Claire is taken away by a band of Scotsmen and this is where she meets Jamie, a man she’ll soon have to marry if she wants to survive.

 

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Claire and Jamie from the series on STARZ

 

This was an outstanding book that kept me entertained throughout. I was completely immersed in this story from start to finish. I loved Claire and Jamie’s smart, yet stubborn characters and enjoyed the formation of their relationship. All the characters had good development with some that I loved and some that I hated, but most were unforgettable. The pacing was perfect and never once did I want to stop reading, except for the few parts I found a tad difficult to read.

Some consider this a romance novel, but I think of it more as historical fiction. It does have a good amount of romance, but so much more than that. I’m not a history buff, but it seems that Diana Gabaldon has really done her research with this series and has spun a tale that can’t be forgotten.

My rating on this one is 5-stars.

5 Sterne


 

Add it on Goodreads or find this edition on Amazon

You can find many editions of this series on Amazon, eBay, and many other sites.

This edition is:

  • Hardcover: 627 pages
  • 1991 Delacorte Press – Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing
  • ISBN 0-385-30230-4

Continue reading “Shabby Sunday: Outlander by Diana Gabaldon – 1991”

Shabby Sunday: The Tall Book of Mother Goose – 1942

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Shabby Sunday Meme

I have a lot of old vintage books and one of my plans when I first started blogging was to do a post every week or so that shared one of my cherished vintage books. Then, I thought that maybe there might be other book bloggers out there that have some vintage books, heirlooms, or maybe some old books from childhood that they might want to share. I decided to start a weekly meme titled ‘Shabby Sunday’ for those who would like to participate and share some of their old vintage books. Do you have some shabby books you’d like to share? Please feel free to participate. Feel free to use the picture I’ve provided if you’d like to. If you decide to do this meme, please consider linking back to me so that I can see the book you’re sharing.


Today’s shabby share is:

The Tall Book of Mother Goose

by Feodor Rojankovsky (Illustrator)

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I’ve had this book since I was very young and can still remember climbing up on the couch to read it with my grandfather. It was published in 1942 and was a part of the school library where my grandfather worked as a teacher and principal. The book was even used by my mother and her siblings. It’s now a part of my home library.

There are over 100 nursery rhymes in this book. Some of my favorites are “The House That Jack Built,” “Old Mother Hubbard,” and “Old King Cole.” My absolute favorite in the entire book is “Sing a Song of Sixpence.”

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My grandfather wouldn’t just read this one, he would sing it. We didn’t even have to be reading the book; we would dance around singing it. It’s a wonderful memory and I’m happy to have this book to share with my kids.

Some of the illustrations are in color and some in black and white. The book is definitely tall at about 12 inches. This 1942 edition is about 120 pages.

My rating is 5-stars.

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Continue reading “Shabby Sunday: The Tall Book of Mother Goose – 1942”

Shabby Sunday: Walking Through Fire by Laurel Lee

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Shabby Sunday Meme

I have a lot of old vintage books and one of my plans when I first started blogging was to do a post every week or so that shared one of my cherished vintage books. Then, I thought that maybe there might be other book bloggers out there that have some vintage books, heirlooms, or maybe some old books from childhood that they might want to share. I decided to start a weekly meme titled ‘Shabby Sunday’ for those who would like to participate and share some of their old vintage books. Do you have some shabby books you’d like to share? Please feel free to participate. Feel free to use the picture I’ve provided if you’d like to. If you decide to do this meme, please consider linking back to me so that I can see the book you’re sharing.


Today’s shabby share is:

Walking Through Fire

by: Laurel Lee

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I’m one of those people who believe that everything happens for a reason and this book is just one example. It fell into my hands at our local library book sale after someone had donated it. I have a thing for vintage books as it is, but there was something special about this one. Little did I know, this would be a book that would help me in the near future with my own health struggles.

The book is a hospital journal written by Laurel Lee, a woman who’s just become stricken with Hodgkin’s while pregnant with her third child. This book is her journey with cancer and everything else in between, including her everyday life with marriage and children. Laurel deals with typical life while being faced with multiple challenges alongside a scary situation that threatens her life and the life of her unborn child. She outlines her experiences in this book.

Why is this book a favorite? What I loved most about it was that it’s a journal–a true account that Laurel was willing to share with others regarding her personal trials and tribulations. Her courage shines through and was an inspiration to me before I experienced something similar. Sometimes our health can get in the way of how we want to live our lives. Often we take our health for granted and I think this book does an excellent job of bringing this to our attention, but at the same time, it’s also a celebration of life.

The cover was designed by Laurel and has many little drawings in the text by the author as well. Like me, this book will be forty years old this September and was published in 1977. It’s roughly one hundred and eighteen pages and a quick read. Mine is the first edition hardcover with a dust jacket.

This remains on my shelf permanently. Even though I found it hard to read at times, it’s one of my favorites and gets a 5-star rating from me. I would recommend it to anyone.

When thou walkest through the fire,
thou shall not be burned,
neither shall the flame be kindled upon thee – Isaiah 43:2

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Continue for book info and where to find it…

Continue reading “Shabby Sunday: Walking Through Fire by Laurel Lee”