Wednesday’s Wordless Picture Books – Birdsong – The Adventures of Polo – Sidewalk Circus

I picked up three new wordless picture books to share with you this week. We enjoyed all three. I hope that you find a few of these interesting!

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Birdsong by James Sturm

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Blurb: Bring the thrilling story of one red bird to life. When an innocent bird meets two cruel kids, their world is forever changed. But exactly how that change unfolds is up to you, in the tradition of Kamishibai—Japanese paper theater. The wordless story by master cartoonist James Sturm is like a haiku—the elegant images leave space for children to inhabit this timeless tale—and make it their own, leading them to learn an ultimate lesson they’ll never forget.

James Sturm is the author of several books for kids including the Adventures in Cartooning series (with Andrew Arnold and Alexis Frederick-Frost) and the forthcoming Ape and Armadillo. James also helped start a college for cartoonists, The Center for Cartoon Studies, in the small railroad village of White River Junction, Vermont.

  • Age Range: 5 and up
  • Grade Level: Kindergarten and up
  • Series: Toon Books
  • Hardcover: 60 pages
  • Publisher: TOON Books (April 5, 2016)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1935179942
  • ISBN-13: 978-1935179948

My Review:

When we first started reading this book we were shocked. It begins with two children abusing some wildlife and it’s uncertain where the story is going to go. As they chase a bird far away, they are met by an angry man who wants to teach them a lesson they will never forget. The message is powerful and children will understand that there are consequences to their actions. This is a wordless picture book that can have many endings and children will have to think about what the actual conclusion means.

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What I loved most about the book was the history in the back. Readers learn about e-toki which means “picture-explaining” and kamishibai which means “paper theater.” Children learn about the importance of these picture stories from Japan and why they were started in the first place. This is a powerful picture book with detailed, yet simple illustrations that kids will certainly enjoy.

Star_rating_4_of_5

 


Sidewalk Circus by Paul Fleischman & Kevin Hawkes

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Blurb: “This delightful book will fascinate children and help them to see their world with new eyes.” — SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL (starred review)
Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls! Step right up and witness an astounding assemblage of tightrope walkers, strong men, sword swallowers, and clowns. The Garibaldi Circus is coming soon, but for those with clear eyes, the performers may already be in the ring. So get ready to sharpen your vision and look very closely — a show like you’ve never seen is about to begin! The creators of WESLANDIA are back in the spotlight with a spectacular, wordless picture book that shows the transformative power of imagination.

  • Age Range: 5 – 9 years
  • Grade Level: Kindergarten – 4
  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Candlewick; Reprint edition (May 8, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 076362795X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0763627959

My Review

This picture story begins in the city streets with regular everyday people going about their day while observing others around them. The Garibaldi Circus will soon be coming to the city, but what’s really happening in the shadows might be more interesting than you think. Children will notice that our ordinary lives are more interesting than we think and all we need to do is pay attention to what’s happening around us.

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We enjoyed the book and ended up starting it over twice. You really have to pay attention to the shadows to see what’s going on. It’s a really unique book and we loved the illustrations.

Star_rating_4_of_5

 

Continue reading “Wednesday’s Wordless Picture Books – Birdsong – The Adventures of Polo – Sidewalk Circus”

Wednesday’s Wordless Picture Books – David Wiesner – Leo Timmers – Matthew Cordell

 

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I have three new wordless picture books to share this week! I hope that everyone who has children in their lives will get to read a few wordless picture books with them this year. It’s such a joyous experience! You might find a few of these interesting.


Tuesday by David Wiesner

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Blurb: A Caldecott classic celebrating twenty years in print.

David Wiesner received the 1991 Caldecott Medal for Tuesday. In the years that followed, he went on to receive two more Caldecotts, and Tuesday went on to sell half a million copies in the United States and to be published in a dozen foreign countries. Now, with remarkable advances in the technology of color reproduction, the original artwork for Tuesday is being reproduced anew, for an edition even more faithful to the palette and texture of David Wiesner’s watercolor paintings. The whimsical account of a Tuesday when frogs were airborne on their lily pads will continue to enchant readers of all ages.

My review

David Wiesner is a favorite as you know from some of my previous reviews. He never ceases to amaze me and this book is such a beautiful and magical addition to our collection.

The story begins in the early evening on a Tuesday and all is quiet at the pond. All of a sudden, the frogs begin to levitate on their lily pads and travel into a nearby town. They visit a woman watching TV, a man having a snack, and a dog running through a yard.

The only text in the book is the indication that it’s Tuesday with the time. Children love the watercolor illustrations and their imaginations can run wild with this story because it’s surreal.

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The idea of frogs traveling on lily pads is so magical and mysterious. How did they do it, and will they be back again next Tuesday?

5-start

Continue reading “Wednesday’s Wordless Picture Books – David Wiesner – Leo Timmers – Matthew Cordell”

Wednesday’s Wordless Picture Books

 

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Lights Out by Arthur Geisert

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I came across this wordless picture book and had to get it because I love Arthur Geisert’s pig stories and illustrations. If you visit my wordless picture book posts, you probably remember the book The Giant Seed that I reviewed awhile back. You can see that one by clicking HERE.

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The story begins with one page of text about a poor little piglet who is told by his parents that the lights must be out by eight o’clock. Little piglet begins to wonder how in the world he’s going to get that light to shut off after he falls asleep, rather than before. He has a big imagination and puts it to work. He devises a plan that includes an assortment of contraptions working together with the goal to turn the light off after he’s fallen to sleep. He uses a series of Dominoes, balls, bats, water, toys and pretty much anything he can use to make his plan work.

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The etched illustrations are very colorful and detailed. It’s so much fun for kids to see his experiment in action as they turn from page to page. Will it work for piglet? Follow along in the story to find out!

5-start

 

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Wednesday’s Wordless Picture Books

 

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I’m back this Wednesday with three more wordless picture books for you guys. I had to take a few weeks off from this post because I was running out of books! I’m pleased with these and hope you’ll enjoy them along with the children in your life too.

To add these on Goodreads, just click the cover and you’ll be redirected.

Sidewalk Flowers by JonArno Lawson & Sydney Smith

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In this picture book, a little girl takes a walk through the city with her father and while on the journey, she decides to start collecting little wildflowers she discovers along the way. Her father is busy doing his own thing and is quite distracted. By the time they’re about ready to head home, she has collected a beautiful bouquet of flowers. What she decides to do with the flowers on her way back home is touching. Follow along in this beautiful picture book to see how sweet, caring, and creative she can be.

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The story is touching and will help children understand the importance of giving and thinking about others. The illustrations were eye catching with the majority of the pages being black and white with splashes of color throughout. It’s definitely a keeper.

Star_rating_4_of_5

 

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Wednesday’s Wordless Picture Books

I picked up three new wordless picture books this week. I can’t express enough about how much I LOVE viewing books like these with children. It really makes them think and use their imagination.

If you’d like to add any of these on Goodreads, just click the title in the review…

Carl’s Christmas by Alexandra Day

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Carl’s Christmas is a story about a dog named Carl and a sweet little baby. Carl is left to be responsible for the baby on Christmas Eve and they go on a little adventure together. This book has text on the very first page and the rest of the book is strictly pictures.

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What I liked about the story was the idea of a dog taking care of a baby. It’s unrealistic, but so adorable. Carl knows how to care for the baby and their adventure consists of strolling around town visiting stores, carolers, and finally a visit with Santa.

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We really enjoyed the classic painted illustrations and couldn’t wait to find out how the story would end. Follow along to see if Carl receives a gift of his own this year.

4-stars

 


Sector 7 by David Wiesner

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Sector 7 by David Wiesner is one of the most imaginative wordless books I’ve read. A boy takes a school trip to the Empire State Building and winds up taking a whole different trip to Sector 7, a cloud dispatch station in the sky. He’s taken there by a little cloud who becomes his friend. He has ideas of his own for what he thinks clouds should look like and he isn’t afraid to share them.

Children will love this picture book as it’s easy to follow with beautiful illustrations. We loved it and talked about it for quite a bit of time. We were surprised to see this author again as we recently read Free Fall. This is definitely a keeper.

stars


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Wednesday’s Wordless Picture Books

This week I have four different wordless picture books to share with you that we really enjoyed. Like most, these are all perfect wordless picture books for parent child reading and enjoyment.

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You can read on to see my reviews on each. If  you’d like to view last weeks picture books and learn some benefits to reading wordless books, you can see my previous post HERE. If you’d like to add some of these wonderful books on Goodreads, just click the title.


The Snowman by Raymond Briggs

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Blurb: Illustrated in full color, this is a wordless story. The pictures have “the hazy softness of air in snow.” A little boy rushes out into the wintry day to build a snowman, which comes alive in his dreams that night. The boy invites him home and in return is taken on a flight high above the countryside.

My review

The Snowman is a wonderful wordless book for children. The story starts with a young boy who sees the snow outside and rushes out of his home to build a snowman. As the boy sleeps, the snowman comes alive and is welcomed into the boy’s home to discover what it’s like inside. In return, the snowman will show him his home as well. A dream to be remembered forever.

This book is packed full of sketched illustrations in color. This is a beautiful Christmas book that can be read by all ages and any time of the year.

stars

Check out this short movie based on The Snowman by Raymond Briggs. It’s introduced by David Bowie!


The Giant Seed by Arthur Geisert

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Blurb: In this follow up to the magnificently inventive Ice, Arthur Geisert once again charms us with his porcine world. This time his pigs must get creative when a volcano destroys their home. Fortunately they got busybefore trouble hit by planting a huge mysterious seed, for it’s the seed plus imagination, as well as a good dose of can-do spirit, that save the day! Illustrated with inventive, sensitive, and unusually lovely etchings that seem to come from an old cherished album, The Big Seed is a worthy successor to Geisert’s Ice.

Award-winning children’s book author Arthur Geisert‘s pigs are legendary in the world of children’s books. They carve ice sculptures, teach Roman numerals, create ingenious machines, and get up to all kinds of antics. Did Arthur grow up on a farm? No. He grew up in Los Angeles and claims not to have seen a pig until he was an adult. Trained as a sculptor in college, Geisert learned to etch at the Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles. He has published just about a book a year for the past thirty years and every one of his books has been illustrated with etchings. In 1996 (as well as once previous to that) he won The New York Times Best Illustrated Award. Geisert lives in Bernard, Iowa.

My review

The Giant Seed by Arthur Geisert is a story about a community of pigs that live near a volcano. They are blessed with the arrival of a giant dandelion seed which they decide to plant and grow. Little do they know, this seed that will soon grow into a new plant just might be a life saver for them all.

We loved the author’s adorable pig illustrations. The ending was left wide open which made me think there might be another book to continue the story, but I haven’t found one yet. This is the first book we’ve read by this author and I’m definitely interested in reading more about this pig community. This one strikes up a lot of conversation!

4-stars


Here I Am by Patti Kim – Pictures by Sonia Sanchez

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Blurb: Newly arrived from their faraway homeland, a boy and his family enter into the lights, noise, and traffic of a busy American city in this dazzling wordless picture book. The language is unfamiliar. Food, habits, games, and gestures are puzzling. They boy clings tightly to his special keepsake from home and wonders how he will find his way. How will he once again become the happy, confident kid he used to be? Walk in his shoes as he takes the first tentative steps toward discovering joy in his new world. A poignant and affirming view of the immigrant experience.

Because this book is based on the author’s experience, here is some author information: Patti Kim was born in Pusan, Korea, and immigrated to the United States on Christmas of 1974 with her mother, father, and older sister. At the age of five, she thought she was a writer and scribbled gibberish all over the pages of her mother’s Korean-English dictionary and got in big trouble for it. Her scribbling eventually paid off. She earned her MFA in Creative Writing at the University of Maryland. She lives with her husband and two daughters who give her plenty to write about every day.

You can visit her blog HERE

My review

Here I Am is a wordless children’s picture book of one incredibly inspiring story of a child’s immigration to the United States.

A child and his family leave their home and move into a busy city in the United States. This is difficult for him and he struggles getting used to his new life in the city. He has a new school, new house, and is surrounded by new people. In his hand he carries a keepsake from his homeland which helps him along the way. He accidentally drops it out of a window and down into the street. He realizes in order to get it back he’s going to have to go outside and explore which might just be the best thing for him.

This is a story about starting a new life and overcoming fear of the unknown. We enjoyed all the rich, detailed illustrations and the author’s note at the end.

stars


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Wednesday’s Wordless Picture Books

I really love reading wordless picture books, especially with children. Children love them and it really sparks their imagination while giving them a break from reading. Here are a few benefits to reading wordless picture books.

Some Benefits to reading Wordless Picture Books

  • helps the reader gain an understanding of story structure
  • develops new vocabulary
  • aids in creative writing expression
  • increases vocabulary skills
  • inspires storytelling
  • helps struggling readers gain confidence
  • helps teach sequencing and narration

In this post I will highlight five wordless picture books that we read this week. You can read my reviews for each one below.


Chalk by Bill Thomson

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Chalk by Bill Thomson is a story about three little girls out and about on a rainy day. They stumble upon a T-rex in a large paved area. The T-rex has a bag in his mouth and the children soon discover that the bag contains an assortment of colored chalk. They decide to draw pictures on the pavement and their drawn pictures begin to come alive! Each child creates their own art on the pavement until another little boy shows up. He decides to draw a gigantic T-rex. Follow along in the story to see if the children can figure out what to do with this giant creation!

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The book illustrations appear animated while the children have lifelike features. The illustrations have the characteristics of creation by digital computer equipment, but they’re not.  Bill Thomson used painting techniques and each illustration is created by hand, using acrylic paint and colored pencils.

stars


Hank Finds An Egg by Rebecca Dudley

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Hank is strolling along the forest floor when he comes upon a little white egg. He’s very curious and begins searching for where the egg came from. After finding that the egg’s home is high in a tree, he must get creative to return the egg to it’s nest. Will Hank succeed?

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I was thoroughly impressed with the illustrations. Each page is a diorama of handmade creations. Rebecca Dudley creates every single item with precise detail. This is one of my favorite wordless picture books this year.

stars


Spot, the Cat by Henry Cole

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Spot, the Cat, is about to embark on an outdoor adventure when he suddenly leaps out his apartment window and into the world. Each page takes the reader on a exploration of the city and Spot is located on each page if you only look. Follow Spot’s journey through a farmer’s market, across a bridge, through a park and beyond as he weaves through the city. Spot’s owner is worried. Will he ever return?

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This is very similar to a Look and Find book in that you have to search for Spot on each page. All the illustrations are black and white and Spot is somewhere new each time. Children will spend a little time finding him as some pages are more difficult than others with trick illustrations added in. It’s a great book for conversation and children love it. I think it’s great for parent-child reading.

stars


Flashlight by Lizi Boyd

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Flashlight by Lizi Boyd is a wordless picture book highlighting a journey through the dark. A child has his flashlight and will make new discoveries in the dark while camping in the forest. There’s a lot to discover in nature if you’ll only take the time to look.

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We enjoyed the dark illustrations with the hidden objects in the stream of the light beam. The boy finds all sorts of night-time creatures, plants, trees, insects and streams which offers insight to everything that’s going on in the dark of night. Children will learn that nighttime offers the opportunity to discover nocturnal creatures while getting a calm feel of nature. This is a perfect bedtime book.

4-stars Continue reading “Wednesday’s Wordless Picture Books”